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Freedom – The Path of Most Resistance

How many advertisers pitch you a weight loss system with the line, “This system really works, but only if you work very hard, eat food you’d rather not eat and stay consistent doing it?”   Sign me up!  No, they are telling you how easy you can lose weight…in the first week!

How about, “Join our gym and get in amazing shape like all these models we just paid to be in our commercial!  Just sign here and watch yourself morph from the couch cocoon to the ripped butterfly.”

Take this pill, read this book, buy our product, hey didn’t save your money?  No problem…just charge it.  What’s in your wallet?  Probably a lot of plastic with high-interest balances.

Americans have been conditioned to look for shortcuts, cut the corners and attain immediate gratification in most everything they do. And although not necessarily wrong in every circumstance, often shortcuts, or the “easy way” does not produce the ultimate results desired.  Is it all about the destination? Or does the journey matter? Is something that is gained, that is not earned, considered as precious as that which is attained with much effort? Not usually.

Our bent may be toward the path of least resistance, but we are about to celebrate a date and anniversary that represents anything but a path of least resistance.

Our bent may be toward the path of least resistance, but we are about to celebrate a date and anniversary that represents anything but a path of least resistance. Remaining under Britain’s rule would have been easier, but the taxation without representation movement was getting folks annoyed and the ever-increasing revenue need of the Island across the pond was finding a whole new taxation class over here in the colonies.

The path of least resistance would have consisted of apathy, grumbling, and inaction. That would have been easier. But that wasn’t the choice of the “Pre-American” people. They embarked on a journey where the destination was desired but not assured. That’s called Freedom.

They embarked on a journey where the destination was desired but not assured. That’s called Freedom.

George Washington suffered staggering losses in battle after battle until he conducted a surprise attack on the Hessians by crossing the Delaware in winter. With men who had little to eat or keep warm, yet they turned the direction of the war in a single night. Think any of that was the path of least resistance?

Although they knew the enemy was reeling in their position, Mark Hodel, along with five other brave Seabees, would not leave their mortar pit while defending their camp against the Viet Cong in 1968. They chose the hard road vs leaving their post…and it cost them their lives. But they did what was right…not easy.

There are infinite stories of the people it took to build this country. Stories that are sobering, heart-wrenching, encouraging, patriotic and selfless.

There are infinite stories of the people it took to build this country. Stories that are sobering, heart-wrenching, encouraging, patriotic and selfless. Those who fought, fought for our freedom.  Those who served in peace-time created a deterrence to evil, but the world knew they were willing to fight at a moment’s notice. Our Founding Fathers who, with guidance from our Creator, and in whose truths are self-evident, did not cower under a rule of government that would not listen to the voices of their people.

No matter our political leaning or which party we align ourselves with, we have the freedom to choose easy or hard paths in our journey. The lessons are clear as we watch fireworks and eat at the family barbecue…we are here and the great American experiment is now 242 years old because countless people chose the path of most resistance. Let’s all blow out the candles on the birthday cake and then commit to do the same in our own lives.

Happy Birthday to the greatest country on the planet!

Photo Credit: James Kresser.

BY: JOHN HODEL  /  Founder + President